The Colonial Navy - Our Ships

Your Adventure Awaits…

Brief Histories of the Ships

Colonial Navy Inc. plans to construct and operate as many as 22 copies of important historic square-rigged ships for adventure sail-training programs on both the East Coast and the West Coast. Trainees, who may range in age from eight to eighty, will normally be accommodated for one week at a time in double cabins. This apparently large number of ships is necessary in order to pay the marketing bill to keep them full year round, and to pay for the office to run them.


The East Coast

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Colonial Navy Inc. plans to build up to 16 full-sized copies of historic American and Canadian square-rigged ships of the period 1607 to 1780. Each will be licensed to carry 12 paying trainees in double cabins. The ships will be operated along the East Coast, the Gulf Coast, the Caribbean, and the Great Lakes, depending upon the seasons and the weather. These ships will be identical below the waterline, and will differ in details, trim, color-schemes, and rigs. They will measure 65 feet long on deck and 20 feet beam. They will normally be sailed in small fleets of from four to six at a time, allowing for inter-vessel competitions afloat and ashore, as well as cooperation between the ships. The office to run the East Coast ships will probably be in Portsmouth, Virginia.

The West Coast

Colonial Navy Inc. plans to operate a parallel square-rigged sail-training program on the West Coast, using up to six reduced-size copies of notable 19th-century clipper ships. Note: it was largely due to the clipper ships that San Francisco developed so quickly into a major seaport, so the return of the clippers to the West Coast on a permanent basis will be very exciting. As with the East Coast program, the ships will all be identical under-water, with different appearances for their topsides. Their rigs will also be identical, which may allow for fairer races between them. These vessels will measure 90 feet length on deck and 21 feet beam, and will set 20 sails; they will be licensed for 22 trainees apiece in double cabins.